Our employment law updates for clients across Greater Manchester

You can find out all the latest news and keep up to date with all the important information through our blog. Here you will find help and advice, information on employment law updates as well as employment law news we think you’ll find interesting. Feel free to explore our online blogs with all the latest industry and employee news and updates.

ACAS guidance on overtime

ACAS guidance on overtime Most employers use overtime at some point, to satisfy increased demands such as a large order or an unexpected increase in work.  The new ACAS guidance explains the difference between voluntary and compulsory overtime. It also describes the two types of compulsory overtime: Guaranteed overtime is where an employer has to…

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Employment Law Update

Employment Law Update Welcome There has been a lot of publicity lately about the employment status of individuals working in the gig economy. Employees and workers have more rights than the genuinely self-employed, so individuals are pushing for this status. Recently, the Supreme Court gave its decision in the high-profile Pimlico Plumbers case. Can someone…

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BULLETIN – JUNE 2018

BULLETIN – JUNE 2018 Welcome The law on constructive dismissal has been under the spotlight this month.  Sometimes, employees claim constructive dismissal because of a ‘last straw’ which pushes them over the edge. The courts have recently considered whether a fair disciplinary process – no matter what the outcome – can ever be that ‘last…

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Giving references

Giving references Employers have a duty of care to employees when writing a reference. You must exercise reasonable care and skill. The reference should be true, accurate and fair. You must take reasonable care that it is not misleading by what is included or omitted from it. If you provide a reference and it contains…

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BULLETIN – MAY 2018

BULLETIN – MAY 2018 Welcome With the gender pay gap reports now published, we know that there is a significant gender pay gap in the UK with men at many companies being paid on average more than women. It does not necessarily mean that those businesses have an equal pay problem – that depends on…

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Redundancy bumping

Redundancy bumping A redundancy arises when there is a reduction in the employer’s requirements for employees to carry out work of a particular kind. Sometimes an employee whose role is redundant can be redeployed into another role in the organisation. The occupier of that second role can be fairly dismissed instead – even though their…

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BULLETIN – APRIL 2018

BULLETIN – APRIL 2018  Welcome The role of Human Resources in disciplinary proceedings continues to be a hot topic. Managers conducting a disciplinary investigation or hearing may need advice from HR. However, HR should confine their advice to technical matters such as the law and procedure. If HR try and influence the decision-maker or persuade…

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Working Time

Working Time There are two recent cases to be aware of in relation to working time, both involving firefighters. The first says that an award for injury to feelings can be made in an employment tribunal if an employee wins a claim of detriment for asserting working time rights. South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue transferred…

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BULLETIN – MARCH 2018

BULLETIN – MARCH 2018 Welcome You may remember the press coverage of the investigation into the former children’s charity Keeping Kids Company and its eventual liquidation in the summer of 2015. The Employment Appeal Tribunal has now ruled that the charity breached collective redundancy laws by failing to collectively consult in the run-up to it…

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Detriment for blowing the whistle

Employees who are whistleblowers have protection from dismissal and detriment (being treated badly) because they blew that whistle on their employers. These so called ‘protected disclosures’ could be disclosures of information about a criminal offence, or breach of health and safety, or other legal obligations. An example of a detriment is refusing to promote someone…

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Bulletin – January 2018

BULLETIN – JANUARY 2018   Introduction  Worker status and rights are rarely out of the press at the moment. The recent EU holiday pay case of King v Sash Window Workshop adds another dimension and could have massive implications if you hire individuals on a self-employed basis as consultants or contractor. If the contractor later…

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Update November 2017

Update November 2017 Introduction With sexual harassment so much in the news, this is a good opportunity for employers to make sure that they are taking adequate steps to protect themselves from claims. The key point to understand is that employers will be liable for any harassment of one employee by another if it is…

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OMG! Emoji!

OMG! Emoji!  You know those buttons at places like airports and service stations that customers can press to show that they feel happy, unhappy, or indifferent about the service they have received? Well, it seems that Sports Direct has implemented something similar to discover how staff feel about the working conditions at one of its…

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Location, location, location

Location, location, location Aziz v The Freemantle Trust Ms Aziz was a care worker who had relocated to the Trust’s Dell Field Court site. Issues arose between her and two other workers, and this triggered a period of difficulties, complaints, suspensions, absences and grievances. The situation was deemed to be dysfunctional, and the Trust decided…

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Race discrimination

Race discrimination Kansal v Tullett Prebon Plc   Mr Kansal was northern Indian, Punjabi in origin and a UK national. He brought nine specific complaints of direct discrimination against his employer. Two of those complaints made it to the EAT. The first was that he had been sidelined and excluded from transactions; he had been…

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Bulletin – October 2017

Bulletin – October 2017 The unmistakable hints of Christmas that are appearing in shops are signaling that 2017 is nearing its close. With next year just around the corner, employers are being urged to make preparations for one major shake-up that will take effect in May 2018. The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) looks set…

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Tackling the pay gap

Tackling the pay gap Following the introduction of gender pay gap reporting in April this year, the Equality and Human Rights Commission has published six steps to reducing disparities in pay related to gender, ethnicity and disability. These are: Address differences in subject and career choices, educational attainment, and access to apprenticeships. Improve work opportunities…

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When is treatment unfavourable?

When is treatment unfavourable? Williams v The Trustees of Swansea University Pension & Assurance Scheme   Unfavourable treatment is an essential element of a disability discrimination claim. The Williams case considered what this actually means. Mr Williams had a number of health problems. After working full-time for the University for 10 years, the University implemented…

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Menopause at work

Menopause at work The Department for Education has published a report that looks at the effects of the menopause on working women. Hot flushes, insomnia and fatigue are just some of the symptoms. But the report highlights that lower productivity, reduced job satisfaction and problems with time management are all possibly consequences. It says that…

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Fees no more

Fees no more R (on the application of Unison) v Lord Chancellor A four-year challenge to the introduction of tribunal fees has ended in victory for UNISON and, the union says, for employees everywhere. As it stands, people will no longer have to pay to bring and pursue cases in the employment tribunal and Employment…

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BULLETIN – September 2017

BULLETIN – September 2017 July and August may not have delivered the perfect summer. But, by way of silver lining, we have had some significant employment law developments. One of these is the publication of the Taylor Review of Modern Working Practices, addressing many of the issues that have been bubbling away in workplaces since…

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BULLETIN – Recruitment

  BULLETIN – Recruitment Welcome to this special edition of our employment law update. It’s about recruitment and how to avoid some of the pitfalls. Workplace laws are not just for employees and workers. Job applicants and even potential job applicants are given some protections, too. It’s why employers embarking on a recruitment process should…

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Widespread wages failures revealed

Widespread wages failures revealed Research has revealed some alarming truths about breaches of employment rights. A preliminary report by Unpaid Britain – a project established by Middlesex University Business School – has looked at the British labour market, with a particular focus on London. Its findings include: One in 12 workers doesn’t receive a pay…

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Share sale didn’t trigger TUPE

Share sale didn’t trigger TUPE ICAP Management Services Ltd v Berry   The Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations, known as TUPE, take care of employees’ rights when, broadly speaking, ownership of the business they work for, or the service they provide, changes hands. An employee can object to the transfer, which will have…

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Conduct and culpability

Conduct and culpability JP Morgan Securities plc v Ktorza This case centered on the question of whether or not an employer has to prove culpability in a conduct dismissal case. Mr Ktorza was an executive director on the foreign exchange desk of the bank. He had received two final written warnings, the second of which…

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Bulletin – July 2017

Bulletin – July 2017 Love it or loathe it, the intensity of this summer’s spell of sunshine and high temperatures took many by surprise. And let’s assume that summer is not over. Are you set up to handle yet more hot days, sunny rays, and a distracted workforce? Employers are expected to be ‘reasonable’. That…

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Bulletin – June 2017

Bulletin – June 2017 We begin this bulletin with news of a must-have accessory in workplaces, and it’s of the canine variety. According to the Guardian, around 8% of employers allow dogs at work. It’s an idea that seems to be taking off, perhaps with good reason. A survey last year by Banfield Pet Hospital…

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High Heels and Workplace Dress

High Heels and Workplace Dress The Government has issued its response to a parliamentary investigation into the issue of discriminatory dress codes at work. It follows a petition instigated by Nicola Thorp, the receptionist who hit the headlines after being sent home for work at PwC for refusing to wear high heels. Existing equality laws…

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Caste in Stone?

Caste in Stone? The Government has opened a public consultation into caste in Great Britain. It is about ensuring that there is appropriate and proportionate legal protection in place so that people are not discriminated against because of their origins. It is also about looking at how that sort of protection would be implemented in…

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Proving Indirect Discrimination

Proving Indirect Discrimination Essop and others v Home Office (UK Border Agency); Naeem v Secretary of State for Justice Mr Essop and colleagues had claimed indirect discrimination. They said that they were passed over for promotion after having failed some assessments at work. Relying on their protected characteristics of age and race they alleged that…

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Sweet treats & obesity

Sweet treats & obesity Dashing to the bakery to pick up cakes for colleagues because it’s your birthday. It’s an odd workplace custom, isn’t it? But if dentists have their way, the ready availability of sweet treats at work will be a thing of the past. It’s fuelling obesity and poor oral health, the Faculty…

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Dismissal For Gross Negligence

Dismissal For Gross Negligence Adesokan v Sainsbury’s Supermarkets Ltd Mr Adesokan had worked for Sainsbury’s for 26 years before he was dismissed for gross misconduct. He was Regional Operations Manager. The Human Resources Partner who worked alongside him sent an inappropriate email to five store managers. It was to do with a procedure that Sainsbury’s…

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Wise Words

Wise Words A University has been in the news for reportedly ‘banning’ the use of certain words. Cardiff Metropolitan has faced criticism from some who perceive this to be a restriction on freedom of speech. But the University has explained that this is about encouraging the use of inclusive language, and that its Code of…

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Long-Term Absence Dismissal

Long-Term Absence Dismissal O’Brien v Bolton St Catherine’s Academy Ms O’Brien was a teacher at the Academy. She took a short period of time off work after having been assaulted by a pupil. That incident and some other factors continued to affect her, culminating in absence for stress and diagnoses of anxiety, depression and post-traumatic…

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Headscarf Decision #2

Headscarf Decision #2 Bougnaoui and another v Micropole SA   On the same day as Achbita, the CJEU decided another case about headscarves. Ms Bougnaoui, a Muslim, was employed in a customer-facing role. A customer complained to the company about Ms Bougnaoui wearing her headscarf while on a site visit. She was eventually dismissed for…

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Diabetes as a disability

Diabetes as a disability Taylor v Ladbrokes Betting and Gaming Ltd   Disability is defined quite strictly in employment law. You are disabled if you have a physical or mental impairment that has a substantial, adverse, long-term effect on your ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities. It’s a neat checklist – in theory, anyway. Add…

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BULLETIN – February 2017

BULLETIN – February 2017 Another month, another case about employment status. This time it’s about a delivery cyclist at the courier company, CitySprint (Dewhurst v CitySprint UK Ltd). A tribunal has decided that Ms Dewhurst was not a self-employed contractor but a worker, and therefore entitled to certain minimum rights. It’s a legal point that…

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Identifying the legal breach

Identifying the legal breach Eiger Securities LLP v Korshunova   An employer who dismisses an employee because, or mainly because, they have made a protected disclosure (‘blown the whistle’) will find that that is automatically unfair. And a worker is protected from being subjected to any detriment for having made this type of disclosure. But…

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Inclusivity is the way forward

Inclusivity is the way forward   The CBI is calling on organisations to become more inclusive. Its latest report sets out the business case for diversity, which includes increased employee satisfaction, better retention, lower recruitment costs and increased productivity. Workplaces that are diverse and inclusive are associated with higher individual performance, the report says, because…

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Justification in discrimination cases

Justification in discrimination cases Buchanan v The Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis Disability discrimination happens when a person is treated unfavourably because of something arising in consequence of their disability, and that unfavourable treatment can’t be objectively justified. The Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) in this case was asked to consider, in the context of…

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Employment Status

Employment Status Aslam and others v Uber The line between employees, workers and the ‘genuinely’ self-employed has come under increased scrutiny in recent weeks – and not just because of the much publicised Uber decision. Last month, the Government announced a wide-ranging review by Matthew Taylor, the Chief Executive of the Royal Society of the…

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Uber Tribunal Decision

Uber Tribunal Decision An Employment Tribunal has, this afternoon, ruled that two drivers who provide services to gig economy stalwart Uber are ‘workers’ within the meaning of the Employment Rights Act 1996. This means they will be entitled to a limited number of employment rights (but not those accruing to ’employees’ – which this case…

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New Minimum Wage rates

New Minimum Wage rates 1st October means one thing: changes to the National Minimum Wage. Here goes: –         The rate for those aged between 21 and 24 has risen from £6.70 per hour to £6.95. –         For workers aged 18 to 20, it’s now £5.55 instead of £5.30. –         The young workers’ rate for those…

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Crackdown on legal highs

Crackdown on legal highs The fate of so-called legal highs has taken a new turn. The Psychoactive Substances Act is now in force, making it an offence to make, supply, offer to supply, import or export any of these substances where they’re intended for human consumption. The sorts of things we’re talking about are stimulants,…

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Bulletin – July 2016

Bulletin – July 2016 While EU membership has been dominating the headlines, the world of employment law has continued to turn. And as we all ponder the Brexit implications, here’s our roundup of some other developments. Acas Code doesn’t apply to ill health Holmes v Qinetiq The Acas Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance…

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Was that a yawn?

Was that a yawn? Let’s face it, every job has its less interesting parts, whether that’s form-filling, filing, or faffing with spreadsheets. But spare a thought for one French worker who is reported to have brought a claim against his employers because his job was too boring. He says that he felt forced to resign…

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A question of status

A question of status Secretary of State for Justice v Windle and Arada A person’s working status is important for all sorts of reasons, but it’s something that often remains unexplored until a problem arises. That is until someone claims employee rights or protection and the employer disputes their entitlement. In Secretary of State for…

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Destruction of confidential information

Destruction of confidential information Arthur J. Gallagher (UK) Ltd v Skriptchenko and others   An employer has successfully argued that its confidential information stored on computers and electronic devices of its ex-employee and their new employer should be destroyed.   Insurance brokerage Gallagher’s former employee Mr Skritptchenko, admitted that he had taken a client list…

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Tighter rules on illegal working

Tighter rules on illegal working On 12 July 2016, some provisions of the Immigration Act 2016 will come into force. These include: –         A new offence of illegal working, and the power to seize illegal workers’ earnings. –         Widening the offence of knowingly employing an illegal migrant to catch employers who have reasonable cause to…

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June 2016 bulletin

June 2016 bulletin Welcome The wait is almost over. On June 10th, Euro 2016 kicks off. Patriotism will be the name of the game as four weeks of high intensity football stand to dominate our screens and our conversations. Employers, be prepared. Be prepared for national rivalries, last-minute holiday requests, staff absences, and the general…

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A weighty issue

A weighty issue  An Employment Judge has been in the news for his view that overweight workers should be better protected by the law. Being fat isn’t, by itself, a protected characteristic under equality laws. There may be a related disability issue, in which case the worker has the right to not be discriminated against.…

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Consultation on pay

Consultation on pay One month on from the introduction of the National Living Wage (NLW), views are being sought on where the National Minimum Wage rates (including the NLW) should be set from April 2017. One area of interest to the Low Pay Commission is how the NLW’s introductory rate of £7.20 is affecting workers,…

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Transgender discrimination

Transgender discrimination  A Totaljobs survey of more than 400 transgender employees from different industries in the UK suggests that inequality is alive and kicking. Sixty per cent reported they had experienced transphobic discrimination (mainly from colleagues, but also from management and during interview). Thirty six per cent of trans workers have left their jobs because…

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Incorporation of company policies

Incorporation of company policies Department for Transport v Sparks Employers should have a whole host of company policies, on everything from equality to data protection. While they’re expected to be followed, they are not necessarily contractual. And if they’re not contractual, it’s far easier for employers to change them. In Department for Transport v Sparks,…

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May 2016 bulletin

May 2016 bulletin Should we stay or should we go? As the EU referendum draws nearer, the arguments for and against remaining in the Union are intensifying. But there are still calls for clarity on what an exit would mean for us all –individually and collectively. The influence of Europe is never all that far…

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March Bulletin

March 2016 Bulletin Junior doctors have barely been out of the news over the last few months. With the Government intending to impose a new contract, the situation continues to bring home just how difficult these issues can be for those caught up in them. Alongside the legal and practical implications of forcing through change…

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Ten ways disciplinary procedures can go wrong for employers

There is nothing more frustrating for employers than discovering that an employee dismissed for blatant misconduct has an arguable claim for unfair dismissal. 1. HR involvement in decision-making Managers carrying out disciplinary investigations and hearings will usually rely on guidance from HR as to policy and procedure, as well as previous disciplinary sanctions for the…

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Legal highs at work

Legal highs at work You probably have an alcohol and drugs policy. But does it cover ‘legal highs’? These are substances that imitate the effects of illegal drugs. They’re generally stimulants, ‘downers’ or hallucinogens, and their use can have serious consequences. According to Acas, there were 129 reported deaths in England, Scotland and Wales in…

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February bulletin 2016

February. The month of hearts, chocolates and helium balloons. Even if your offices aren’t filled to the brim with roses, Valentine’s Day should remind every employer that love can – and often does – blossom at work. There’s no getting away from that, and it’s not necessarily a bad thing. Happiness breeds productivity. But when…

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Competitive interview leads to disability discrimination

Competitive interview leads to disability discrimination Waddingham v NHS Business Services Authority During a redundancy process, Mr Waddingham was diagnosed with cancer. This meant that he was disabled for employment law purposes, imposing additional obligations on his employer – including the duty to make reasonable adjustments. He was interviewed for a new role within the…

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Kitchen possible

Kitchen possible? If you watched the TV documentary Kitchen Impossible, you are bound to have been left with more than just an impression of the pressures involved in the catering industry. The series followed a group of disabled people learning the ropes under the guidance of Michel Roux Jr. And it exposed many of the…

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Transgender guidance

Transgender guidance A new guide has been published to help employers deal properly with transgender staff. It’s all about creating a more inclusive culture. As well as helping employers recruit and retain transgender staff, the guide sheds light on the day-to-day management of transgender issues. One of the really interesting sections is about handling situations…

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Bulletin – January 2016

January 2016 Bulletin If you have embarked on a disciplinary or two after the festivities, you won’t be alone. The perils of alcohol-fueled Christmas parties are well-documented, and their aftermath often leaves employees with more than just a red face and a tarnished reputation. The point is that January is the month for sorting out.…

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Gender equality

Gender equality As part of moves to close the gender pay gap, the Government has announced that larger employers – those with more than 250 employees – will be forced to publish details of the bonus payments they make to male and female staff. This is expected take effect in the first half of 2016.…

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In a group to TUPE?

Inex Home Improvements Ltd v Hodgkins Where an organisation is to take over the delivery of a service, workers who currently do that work sometimes transfer over to that new service provider. It’s a fundamental rule of TUPE. However, only workers who are assigned to an “organised grouping of employees” make the move. And that…

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Zero hours guidance

Does your business rely to some extent on casual labour? If so, you may well be using zero hours contracts. They can be really useful, flexible ways of covering things like staff illness, seasonal work, projects and ‘on-call’ duties. But you won’t have failed to notice that zero hours contracts have been in for some…

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The meaning of ‘public’

  Underwood v Wincanton In May this year we reported the case involving the estate agents, Chestertons. It was about whistleblowing; in particular, the requirement that a worker must reasonably believe that their disclosure is in the public interest in order to benefit from whistleblowing protection. The case decided that something that was of interest…

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November Bulletin

  Snowballs and open fires aside, winter isn’t all fun and games.  Dark mornings and dark afternoons pose their own mood-detracting challenges for workers and employers alike. And that’s not all. Acas has a guide to dealing with winter’s workplace issues. It lists adverse weather, colds and flu, a flurry of holiday requests, and wellbeing…

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Nine important tips when changing Employee’s Terms and Conditions

Changing contracts of employment: nine key considerations for Employers. Be aware of the risks attached to changing contracts Employers cannot change employees’ contracts unilaterally. An employer that makes changes to its employees’ contracts that will have a negative impact on them, without going through the proper process, risks being in breach of contract. This could result in…

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Withdrawal of job offer due to disability was not unfair.

Corry v Merseyrail Electric 2002 Ltd ET/2400795/2015 disability discrimination | discrimination arising from disability | reasonable adjustments An employment tribunal has found that an employer did not commit discrimination arising from disability and met its duty to make reasonable adjustments when it withdrew a conditional job offer after health and safety concerns over a job…

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Sick employees and TUPE

BT Managed Services v Edwards In another TUPE case, the issue was about who does and who doesn’t transfer. In particular, is a long-term sick employee who isn’t working “assigned immediately before the transfer” so that their employment transfers under TUPE? Mr Edwards was considered to be permanently sick. There were no prospects of him…

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October changes

October (along with April) is always a significant month for employment law. It’s when changes take effect. These include, from 1 October 2015: An increase in the National Minimum Wage from £6.50 to £6.70 per hour for those aged 21 and over. For workers aged between 18 and 20, it rises to £5.30 and for…

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Choice of companion

Choice of companion Stevens v University of Birmingham Providing the statutory or contractual minimum isn’t always enough. While it may discharge your legal duty when it comes to giving staff enough holiday leave or paying them a salary, for example, sometimes you need to go further. Take disciplinary situations. The law says that an employee…

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ACAS Guides

Acas guides When it comes to getting to grips with equality and discrimination, there can never be too much help at hand. Acas has just issued a new set of best practice guides covering: the basics preventing discrimination dealing with discrimination. They’re well worth a read. Find them at http://www.acas.org.uk/equality. There’s also an easily digestible…

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Employer discriminates against Employee with cancer

Competitive redeployment exercise: NHS trust should have used alternative assessment method for employee with cancer. Waddingham v NHS Business Services Authority ET/1804896/2013 & ET/1805624/2013 disability discrimination | discrimination arising from disability | duty to make reasonable adjustments An employment tribunal has held that an NHS trust committed discrimination arising from disability and failed to make…

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Dealing with employees bad-mouthing the organisation on Facebook

Is your disciplinary policy fit for purpose? In the recent scandal involving Lord Sewel’s behaviour when not in the House of Lords, the peer waited several days before resigning following the media frenzy. The incident may have caused employers to question whether their own disciplinary policies cover an employee’s activities outside work, including where this brings…

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MiHomecare: One of UK’s biggest care agencies being sued for paying below minimum wage

One of Britain’s biggest care agencies is being sued for allegedly paying below the minimum wage by refusing to reimburse staff for their travel time between home visits. MiHomecare, which markets itself under the slogan “We care about care”, is facing an employment tribunal claim from a former employee who says she often worked 12-hour…

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Banker dubbed ‘Crazy Miss Cokehead’ awarded £3.2m for sexual harassment

Cambridge graduate Svetlana Lokhova in cash pay-out from London branch of Sberbank CIB after being driven to mental breakdown by bullying colleagues A banker nicknamed “Crazy Miss Cokehead” and “Miss Bonkers” by bullying male colleagues has been awarded £3.2 million for sexual harassment. Cambridge graduate Svetlana Lokhova, 33, was a “resilient person” driven to a…

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Fit for Work service in place

Fit for Work service in place Implementation date: Autumn 2015 The Fit for Work service, previously known as the Health and Work Service, will offer free occupational health assistance to employees, employers and GPs. Key details Following a review of the sickness absence system in Great Britain, conducted by Dame Carol Black and David Frost CBE, the…

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August Bulletin

August Bulletin As the Employment Tribunal is still quiet take a look at these developments within the law. Firstly…. The Government introduces the Fit for Work Scheme! Implementation date: Autumn 2015 The Fit for Work service, previously known as the Health and Work Service, will offer free occupational health assistance to employees, employers and GPs. Key details…

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Drug testing at work: could it ever work?

Drug testing in the workplace: could it ever work? Personnel Today looks at the legal and financial challenges involved in introducing a workplace drug-testing regime. Metropolitan Police Commissioner Bernard Hogan Howe recently announced to an all-parliamentary group on cannabis that mandatory drug testing should be introduced for millions of workers (on the Independent website). His rationale was…

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July update

  July bulletin Parental leave for grandparents? As the school summer holidays approach, the annual juggle of all juggles looms large for many parents. Childcare over the six or more weeks of children’s time off is rarely a one-person job. And grandparents are prime sources of support. Things could be set to change for the…

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September 2015 bulletin

Unison’s challenge to the introduction of fees in employment tribunal cases has been rejected by the Court of Appeal. The union’s General Secretary has described the decision as “a huge disappointment and a major setback for people at work”. But it seems that the fight continues, with the Supreme Court now in sight. This news…

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Our recent promotions

Look no further. If you are looking for some great value in regards to legal advice, have a look at our recent promotions. How can accountants get free legal advice? What about people in the manufacturing industry? Or how about just any business who wants to purchase unlimited time at a top notch help desk?…

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Lessons learned from a stress at work case

I recently had the good fortune to be involved in a successful stress at work claim where the employer eventually agreed to an out-of-court settlement of a little over £250,000.   In this case, the employee brought a personal injury claim for workplace harassment and bullying in his role as an administrative officer for a…

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Making reasonable adjustments for a redundancy selection criteria may still give rise to compensation!

Adjusted scoring for disabled employees Employers or HR professionals considering a selection criteria as part of a redundancy process must ensure they are not directly or indirectly discriminating against an Employee who may score less on  a particular criteria due to their protected characteristic. As seen in the recent case of Dominique v Toll Global…

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Self-employed or Employee?

Status is what it is In the recent case summary below is a warning to all Employers that Tribunals can, will and do make rulings (regardless of agreements and arrangements between the parties) of Employee and Employer relationships, even if they intended otherwise! Plastering Contractors Stanmore v Holden   Mr Holden was employed by Plastering…

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Shared Parental Leave

Shared parental leave – Are you ready? Around about now, some parents-to-be will be thinking ahead to next April. In less than nine months’ time babies will start to be born to mothers, fathers and partners or will be placed with adopters who are entitled to a new form of shared parental leave.   The…

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For further information regarding employment law updates, call us on 0161 413 9070.